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The 3 priorities of the Tripartite Alliance

Within the framework of their close collaboration and the development of joint strategies to prevent health risks at the human–animal–ecosystems interface, the FAO, OIE and WHO set three priority areas in 2011.

Animal influenza

Antimicrobial resistance

Rabies

Influenza portal
(under renovation)

Antimicrobial resistance portal

Rabies portal

The worldwide spread of the avian influenza H5N1 epidemic at the beginning of the 2000s, with its host of economic and health consequences, intensified the joint work of the FAO, OIE and WHO. Since then, the three organisations regularly exchange follow-up information on the global animal influenza situation.


OIE/FAO global network of expertise on animal influenza


Established in 2005, this network of international experts is intended to monitor influenza in humans more effectively, in issues related to the animal–human interface. Since 2009 it has extended its field of action to all animal influenzas and continues to increase its activities.


In particular, OFFLU collaborates with WHO to contribute to the early preparation of human vaccines.

Antibiotics are essential for human health, and animal health and welfare. Over-use and abuse can cause the emergence of bacteria that do not respond to antibiotics, i.e. antibiotic resistance.

This phenomenon limits the effectiveness and availability of antimicrobials and seriously jeopardises effective control of infectious diseases throughout the world.

At the same time, globalisation aids the spread of pathogens, including resistant bacteria, across the planet.

The joint actions of the FAO–OIE–WHO are aimed at:

  • ensuring that antimicrobials maintain their effectiveness
  • promoting their responsible and prudent use
  • ensuring that everyone has access to high-quality medicines

 

FAO–OIE–WHO factsheet on antimicrobial resistance

Rabies still kills tens of thousands of people every year. However, we have all the methods needed to prevent and eliminate this disease.


Since 2011, the Tripartite Alliance has developed a joint global strategy to control this disease.


Its first priority is good governance of the distribution of resources, both public and private, local, national and international, to carry out preventative actions in animals, particularly vaccination of dogs.


FAO–OIE–WHO factsheet on rabies

 

 

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