World Organisation for Animal Health

Font size:

Language :

Search:

Advanced search

Home > Solidarity > Global studies

OIE Studies

 

Three economic studies on the Prevention and Control of Animal Diseases Worldwide were conducted by the OIE in 2006 and 2007 and were financed by the World Bank:

Part I: Economic analysis - Prevention versus outbreak costs

Part II: Feasibility study - A global fund for emergency response in developing countries

Part III: Pre-feasibility study - Supporting insurance of disease losses

 

These three studies were presented during the International Conference co-organised by the World Bank (WB) and the World Organisation for Animal health (OIE) in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations: “Global Animal Health Initiative: The Way Forward”, held in Washington DC (USA), at the World Bank Headquarters on October 9-11, 2007. The conclusions of this conference validated the findings and recommendations of the three studies.

 

In 2008 after an international call for tender, the OIE commissioned Civic Consulting to conduct a study on the ‘Cost of National Prevention Systems for Animal Diseases and Zoonoses in developing and transition countries’. This study was co-funded by the World Bank and the European Union. The initial aims of the study were twofold: (a) estimate the “peace time” costs of Veterinary Services allowing early detection and rapid response to emerging and re-emerging diseases in different regions, economies, animal health systems and eco-systems; and (b) develop economic indicators within the OIE-PVS Tool. The study is based on a review of relevant literature, results of in-depth research in nine OIE member countries, and an extensive analysis of possible economic indicators.

 

In 2009 after an international call for tender, the OIE commissioned PHYLUM to conduct a study on ‘Listing and Categorisation of Priority Animal Diseases, including those Transmissible to Humans’. This study was co-funded by the World Bank and the European Union. The objective was “to facilitate regional/national veterinary authority management decision making on priorities and categorisation of all animal diseases and animal-related threats”.

Top