What we do

We ensure transparency in the global animal disease situation, collect, analyse and disseminate veterinary scientific information, encourage international solidarity in the control of animal diseases, safeguard world trade by publishing health standards for international trade in animals and animal products, improve the legal framework and resources of national Veterinary Services, to provide a better guarantee of food of animal origin and to promote animal welfare through a science-based approach.

Animal Health and Welfare

One of OIE’s missions is to ensure transparency in and enhance knowledge of the worldwide animal health situation. Among the formal obligations of OIE Member Countries is the submission of information on the relevant animal disease situation – including on zoonoses present on their territory – in the most timely and transparent way. A single OIE list of  notifiable terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases has been established for this purpose. Since 2005, to accomplish its mandate the OIE created and managed the World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS) which was coupled with WAHIS interface, providing information on 117 listed diseases for 2021. 

©OIE/H.Bader
©OIE/H.Bader

Standards

On the current trend of globalisation, animal health measures have increasing importance to facilitate safe international trade of animals and animal products while avoiding unnecessary impediments to trade. In light of this, the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) encourages the members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to base their sanitary measures on international standards, guidelines and recommendations, where they exist.

©OIE/Maurine_Tric
©OIE/Maurine_Tric

Global Initiatives

Controlling zoonotic pathogens at their animal source – that is, pathogens that can be transmitted from animals to humans and vice versa – is the most effective and economic way of protecting people. Consequently, global strategies to prevent and control pathogens must be developed if we are to protect public health. These should be coordinated at the human–animal–ecosystems interface and applied at the national, regional and global levels, through the implementation of appropriate policies.

©OIE/A.Sadid
©OIE/A.Sadid